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Spring is here, and so are the wild flowers! Pinks, purples, yellows and more, so colorful!

#pacmam #research #wildflowers #colorful #flowers #spring
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Update!! Good news, it looks like the female elephant seal at skyline beach has decided to find another place to haul out. She was no where to be seen on the beach at 10am today, so we took down our caution tape and cones. Hopefully she found a more quiet spot to rest. Orca Network ...

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PLEASE stay back and keep dogs away. She needs time to rest as she molts.

Well this was a surprise heading to the field today- a female elephant seal hauled out on the Skyline Beach (this is the same one that was in the road yesterday). We have contacted the stranding network (Orca Network) and it looks like she is healthy and just looking for a place to molt. We have put up some caution tape to alert people to her presence and give her space.
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Our Research Director Dr. Cindy Elliser got to head out with Deception Pass Tours on Sunday to search for gray whales! As promised, here are some of the best pics of the day. We will be sharing these and the sighting data with Cascadia Research Collective who keep track of the North Puget Sound Gray whales (The Sounders) that hang out here. One we could positively ID as Lucyfer, #723.

#graywhales #sounders #whales #pacmam #research #sharingdata #realscientists
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4 days ago

Pacific Mammal Research - PacMam

This is amazing work by our colleagues at Cascadia Research Collective!!! Seeing beaked whales is rare enough, but breaching and this close? So awesome!Yesterday was the first day of an 8-day field project off Kona, Hawai'i. Although the project mainly focuses on short-finned pilot whales, the highlight of the day was a breaching Blainville's beaked whale! We've only seen this species breaching on a few prior occasions, and this is the first time we've ever obtained photos of this species breaching.

These photos show the highly-arched lower jaw of an adult male, with the erupted teeth extending above the upper jaw. This individual has a lot of white oval scars, caused by cookie-cutter shark bites - we use these scarring patterns to identify individuals, as they remain visible for up to about 20 years. On the ventral photo you can see the throat grooves, characteristic of beaked whales. The brownish coloration on the head (and outlining the throat grooves) is from diatoms. For more photos and information on the project check out www.cascadiaresearch.org/hawaiian-cetacean-studies/April2019

If you want more information on beaked whales in Hawai'i, check out www.cascadiaresearch.org/hawaiian-cetacean-studies/beaked-whales-hawaii

Photos taken under NMFS Permit No. 20605
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